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Julie Aitcheson, Author at Hemp Market Report

Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonFebruary 19, 2020
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6min00

Even though the FDA has expressed its displeasure at adding CBD to food, that hasn’t stopped hamburger chains from tossing in some cannabidiol to enhance their burgers. The trend was started last year when on April 20th   of 2019 (yep, that’s 4/20), Carl’s Jr. became the first fast-food chain to sell a CBD burger at one of its franchises in Denver, Colorado. The ambitiously named “Rocky Mountain High: Cheeseburger Delight” was composed of two beef patties, pickled jalapenos, pepper jack cheese, fries, and a Santa Fe sauce infused with 5mg of CBD. And the price? $4.20, of course.

The “Rocky Mountain High”, which was only available for one day, was more of a concept test than a menu change, and given that the location sold more than 100 of them within the first hour and ran out entirely by 4 pm, it was one that the CBD burger passed with flying colors. 

That has sparked Colorado-based Illegal Burger to offer what it calls its biggest differentiator, “its exclusive line of CBD products.” The chain is using the idea of CBD burgers as a way to entice new franchisees. On its website, it states, “As an Illegal Burger franchise owner, you will: Be part of the first CBD restaurant franchise in the U.S.” The company backs its decision by saying, “Cannabinoid, or CBD, is attributed to many health benefits. Recently, the FDA approved of its use to treat two forms of childhood epilepsy, and consumers report it positively impacting anxiety, sleep disorders, and even chronic pain.”

The CBD burger was good for business and, according to reporting by Mike Adams at Forbes.com, even healthier for consumers than a dose of CBD all by itself. Adams cites a study that dosed two separate groups of participants with CBD. One group was placed under fasting conditions (no breakfast), while the other group was fed a high-fat meal. Those who partook of the high-fat meal before consuming a dose of CBD appeared to have a higher absorption rate (as demonstrated by a higher concentration of CBD in their systems) than their fasting counterparts.

So will Carl’s Jr. and Illegal Burgers along with the absorption rate study lead more fast food restaurant chains to jump on the CBD bandwagon in the months and years to come? To a large extent, this depends on how far the FDA goes in doubling down on restrictions prohibiting the addition of CBD to foods and dietary supplements in interstate commerce. Food safety officials in Maine, New York City, Ohio, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, and Georgia have all banned the addition of CBD to food.

An April 2019, an  Inverse article on the Carl’s Jr. CBD burger reveals that the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act prohibiting any active substance in a pharmaceutical (which, thanks to the advent of  FDA-approved anti-seizure medication Epidiolex, CBD is) from being added to food products further empowers regulators to crack down on the issue. Yet despite the fact that these laws are clearly worded with little room for interpretation, their enforcement still appears to be discretionary, as both the FDA and hemp companies scramble to definitively ensure that the CBD available to the public is pure, potent, and safe.

While private chefs and smaller-scale restaurants are still tempting fate (and upping their prices) to bring CBD and cannabis to the dining public, higher-profile establishments are taking the precautionary principle until federal regulations and law enforcement sort themselves out. Still, given that a National Restaurant Association survey identified CBD and cannabis-infused foods as the top restaurant trend in 2019, there’s still a chance that American consumers might be seeing some “special sauce” on offer at their local drive-thru. 


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonFebruary 14, 2020
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4min00

It’s no secret that advertising channels including Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Amazon, and Google do not allow brands to promote any form of ingestible hemp or marijuana, forcing companies to find other ways to advertise and generate interest in their offerings. What is often mysterious to those most impacted by these restrictions, such as hemp start-ups, is why some brands seem to slip through mysterious loopholes while others find themselves banned.

Facebook has done some waffling on the issue, allowing some ads for topical hemp that direct to landing pages featuring ingestible forms of CBD. Facebook claims “sole discretion” in determining what constitutes advertising or paid promotion of ingestible hemp, leading many businesses to have their accounts deleted without fully understanding why. The action is typically a result of a violation of Facebook’s “Community Standards”, which forbid paid distribution of ads related to CBD (which Facebook classifies similarly to drugs or alcohol). There are instances, as was the case with Cannaramic promoter Felicia Palmer (profiled by The Verge), whose ad account was disabled entirely even though she was not paying for distribution of her posts about CBD.

Instagram, owned by Facebook, is reportedly somewhat more lax. Users are not penalized as often when advertising CBD products for internal use. With Instagram and Twitter, there is still a risk of having an account permanently shut down if there is an attempt to sell products. According to a Digiday article published in June 2019, Google has begun experimenting with allowing ads for topical products as long as they don’t explicitly state that they contain CBD. Users still complain that some ads clearly promoting ingestibles get featured while others do not, to which Google Support’s primary response seems to be “we can’t check all ads all the time”. If a company chooses to run a Google AdWords advertisement promoting CBD and gets caught, it runs the risk of being prevented from future advertisements whether they are related to CBD or not.

Advertisers are finding ways to circumvent these systems with the help of various marketing experts. Focusing social media posts on education (i.e. “content marketing”) is one such strategy, as is being careful not to use words that are commonly flagged. Ecommerce platform BigCommerce suggests focusing on SEO (search engine optimization), or even hiring an SEO expert. A professional can ensure that keywords (which would be considered marketing and advertising materials in the event of an FDA or FTC investigation)  do not go against FDA or FTC guidelines such as those pertaining to health and medical claims.

Events, sponsorships, cross-promotion, storytelling (e.g. Charlotte’s Web’s epilepsy narrative), e-newsletters, local and national TV ads, and influencer endorsements are also strategies that the industry’s marketing professionals recommend. They encourage hemp entrepreneurs not to be forestalled by the limitations of social marketing. Despite the fact that, according to eMarketer, Facebook and Google accounted for 57 percent of the U.S. digital ad market as of 2018, emphasizing quality, verifiability, and price point can help producers come out ahead.


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonFebruary 10, 2020
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5min00

As more consumers turn to medicinal herbs for their wellness needs or simply to keep current with trendy boho culture, CBD is proving a ubiquitous addition to the scene.  Everyone from CBD industry giants like Charlotte’s Web to boutique brands with witchy cred like Sacred Smoke Herbals is marketing soothing CBD smokes without the addictive chemicals of conventional tobacco products in the form of pre-rolled CBD joints, and consumers are lining up, and lighting up, in response. 

In its forecast of leading trends in 2020, Canna Trading Company featured CBD pre-rolls as a way to consume CBD in its most bioavailable form. (Bioavailability refers to the amount of a consumed substance that actually becomes available for uptake in the body.) When smoked, CBD enters the body through two pathways, the mouth and also the lungs, which deliver CBD directly to the bloodstream. 

Jacob Eppinger, writing for online platform Odyssey, differentiates between CBD pre-rolls, which look exactly like a joint made with THC-rich cannabis, and CBD cigarettes, which are also experiencing a popularity surge. CBD cigarette manufacturers such as Wild Hemp offer smokable CBD without the visual stigma of smoking a joint. CBD manufacturers are eager to cater to the segment of the population that wants to inhale its CBD incognito, without exhaling that signature funky-smelling cloud of smoke. Vendors like Hemp86 have developed smokable CBD products without the funk, and are ranked among the most popular brands on the market. 

Smoking herbs in order to benefit from their medicinal properties is not a new concept. People have long used herbal cigarettes containing such lung-supportive herbs as mullein and coltsfoot, either blended with tobacco or on their own as a way of cutting back on tobacco or making a smoking habit “healthier”. Other relaxing herbs like damiana, lavender, mugwort, and now CBD, are smoked for their non-psychoactive “chill out” effect. 

Pre-rolls provide a cheap, easy way for CBD novices to dip a toe into the cannabidiol world without a huge initial investment. It is possible to buy high-quality hemp flower (which contains the highest potency of CBD) by the gram at a fraction of the cost of oil, though the health benefits appear anything but comparable. Mathew Gold, a staff attorney for the Federal Trade Commission, warns that “simply being free of additives—or, in the case of herbal cigarettes, nicotine, doesn’t make them safer. Any kind of cigarette you smoke has tar and carbon monoxide, which have very real health hazards associated with them.” 

Despite this fact, sales of hemp pre-rolls remain strong. In an article for Hemp Industry Daily, Brightfield Group analyst Bethany Gomez estimates that the smokable hemp market has grown 250 percent since 2017. By 2018, 41 percent of CBD users of the 5,000 surveyed had entirely replaced tobacco with CBD. It remains to be seen whether the pre-roll trend will burn itself out in 2020 or become a new fixture in the CBD consumer’s daily routine, but for now, smokable CBD is sparking plenty of interest.


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonJanuary 29, 2020
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5min00

The term “disruptor” is being flung far and wide these days, applied to everyone from climate crusader Greta Thunberg to companies reimagining the consumer status quo such as Beyond Meat and Thinx. CBD also makes the disruptor spectrum, at least in the context of the beauty industry according to “The Impact Series: Disrupting Beauty”, a report published by research and content consultancy Prohibition Partners. 

The report documents CBD’s popularity in the beauty industry, which is growing by leaps and bounds due to its purported benefits, including being anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, antibacterial, antipollution, and having collagen-promoting properties. Testing that substantiates these claims and determines the concentration of CBD necessary to ensure therapeutic value is still in progress, but that is not preventing big names from jumping on the CBD bandwagon. Retailers like Walgreen’s, Walmart, CVS, Ulta, Nordstrom, and Sephora already stock topical CBD beauty products on their shelves. 

Prohibition Partners projects that the CBD skincare market sales will reach $959 million by 2024, yet the lack of regulations or industry standards for quality and strength makes CBD skincare a bit of a Wild West into which many investors hesitate to venture. Hemp seed oil has long been a favorite ingredient of companies looking to blend nourishing creams and lotions with “all-natural” cachet, but some producers are now deliberately conflating hemp seed oil with CBD in order to sell products at a higher premium. This sleight of hand is not expected to outlast 2020 as the FDA begins to crack down on such claims and more customers demand a COA (Certificate of Analysis) from an accredited third-party laboratory in order to verify CBD content and potency. As these pieces fall into place, major beauty brands like Estée Lauder and L’Oréal test out the market by featuring hemp seed oil (without CBD) in a few of their products, part of a “wait and see” strategy until CBD catches up with its own hype. 

Indie brands are the real disruptors in this market, forging ahead with actual CBD products from pillow mists (OTO) to lip gloss (Saint Jane). The need to stand out in an indie market over-saturated with personal care brands puts positive pressure on start-up companies to innovate and distinguish themselves. The new frontier of CBD provides just that opportunity. Indie brands are succeeding by finding novel uses for CBD that present a whole new paradigm for what a beauty product can do. Kana Vita, an indie luxury brand selling “clean”, top-quality beauty unguents formulated in a Swiss lab by “CBD experts with a background in Medical Cannabis”, is a prime example. 

With an increased emphasis on purity and consumer education, indie brands like Kana Vita ride a new wave of CBD products, in response to a call from discerning customers demanding more for their money. If Prohibition Partners’ projections for CBD beauty are accurate, this is a model that the larger brands would do well to emulate, when and if they decide to double down on CBD’s future in the beauty industry.


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonJanuary 23, 2020
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4min00

Just over a year from the date when the 2018 Farm Bill removed hemp from the list of controlled substances and legalized it for industrial growth, issues plaguing hemp producers in 2019 are coming to light. The most dominant pitfalls include a glutted market, unpredictable climate, problems with mold and pests, and a chronic shortage of adequate drying facilities.

Seasoned farmers are no strangers to these types of problems, but industrial hemp poses a new challenge: how to bring a crop in under the .3% THC limit mandated by the federal government.

In an October article by Chuck Abbot at www.agriculture.com, analysts at agricultural lender CoBank forecasted that changing federal regulations would make it difficult for growers to keep up with guidelines for testing plants for excess THC. The National Law Review published a piece on Jan. 19, 2020 entitled “Key Takeaways From USDA Final Interim Rules for Domestic Hemp Production”. (These interim rules are set to expire in 2021 and will be replaced by finalized regulations.)

The scope of the rules includes conditions for growing, processing and/or selling hemp, and requires an approved testing and sampling procedure to ensure that no plant exceeds .3% THC content. Unfortunately, the currently approved method focuses solely on identifying the THC content of the plant rather than its genetic profile (which can definitively identify the plant as hemp). Testing only for THC content leaves this undetermined.

A hemp plant can “go hot” (aka experience a spike in THC levels) due to using a new seed variety, environmental factors, or a plant left to flower for too long. This can lead to what the National Law Review article describes as “excessive non-compliance and crop destruction”, not to mention devastating financial losses for growers. Writing for local Denver publication Westword, Mathew Van Deventer reports that fourth-generation farmer Randy Taylor was forced to destroy eighty acres under hemp production when that hemp tested at .47% THC by the Colorado Department of Agriculture. The CDA is attempting to address this conundrum by approving and overseeing the development of industrial hemp seeds specifically engineered for low THC/high CBD content.

Theresa Bennett’s Q&A with Vote Hemp President Eric Steenstra at www.hempgrower.com  provides further insight into the issue. Steenstra shares that there has been almost a 500% increase in the number of people growing hemp nationwide over last year. These new growers are largely unfamiliar with the complexities of the genetic seed make-up required to keep THC in crops from spiking. As a result, buyers are favoring larger-scale operations with tested seed stock and reliable facilities, which edges new growers out of the market before they gain a foothold.

Despite the obstacle that regulations regarding THC content pose for unseasoned producers, industrial hemp still shows a profit margin generous enough to lure those willing to educate themselves and keep abreast of the changing guidelines into the industry. Hopefully, the lessons of 2019 will make for a less perilous and more profitable learning curve for aspiring hemp entrepreneurs in 2020.


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonJanuary 21, 2020
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4min00

To say that 2019 was a boom year for the CBD industry would be a massive understatement, and 2020 is primed to top the record sales and product innovation that have come to characterize this surging market.

On December 20, 2018, President Trump signed the Farm Bill into law, a move which removed hemp from the government’s controlled drug category and spurred farmers across the country to repurpose agricultural land previously used to grow feed and food crops such as corn and alfalfa for hemp varieties with high CBD and low THC (.3% or less) content. Farmers experiencing demand and profit surges since converting their land for hemp cultivation were profiled in a CNN report in April that projected sales of hemp products to be over 2.2 billion dollars by 2022.

Market activity in 2020 will go a long way towards determining whether or not hemp’s profitability can sustain its robust trajectory. Alexi Korybut, CEO of EcoGen Laboratories (one of the largest hemp manufacturers and suppliers in the U.S.) predicts that CBD consumers will skew increasingly Baby Boomer and become more conscientious about the quality and safety of the products they buy. Korybut also projects a greater focus on other cannabinoids such as CBG and CBN as their specialized effects become more widely known.

A 2020 forecast by Rich Maturo of information, data and measurement firm Nielsen predicts that cannabinoid education efforts, especially those targeted towards health care providers, will greatly increase in 2020. (Nielsen data shows that primary health care providers do more than any other demographic to drive brand loyalty and customer usage in the CBD market.) In addition, Maturo projects that CBD prices will fall while the number of hemp farmers entering the industry will continue to rise, as will the percentage of current farmers increasing acreage dedicated to hemp cultivation.

Despite these positive projections, the hemp industry has experienced its share of problems, as outlined in an October article by Iris Dorbian for Forbes.com. These issues include a lack of widespread, scientifically sound information about the legality and benefits of CBD products, which often deters retailers from carrying hemp products. In addition, changing regulations make it difficult for manufacturers and retailers to keep up as new data emerges about drug interactions and the viable use of CBD as a food additive.

The quality and efficacy of products vary greatly as consistent industry-wide standards are still in process. Dorbian cites a press release from CEO of ValidCare Patrick McCarthy, who echoes Alexis Korybut’s predictions of a growing emphasis on safety and quality, escalating Baby Boomer consumption, and interest in CBG and CBN as features of the hemp industry’s growth in 2020.

Though projections may vary, there do appear to be strong commonalities that provide a clarified, if not completely clear, view of what 2020 holds for the CBD/hemp industry.  What is clear is that the impact of hemp-derived cannabinoids will be felt in the health care industry, agricultural system, and consumer market far beyond the coming year.

 


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonDecember 18, 2019
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4min00

Whether as a critique of consumer culture, out of economic necessity, or as the marker of a hipsteresque devotion to all things local and artisanal, DIY (Do It Yourself) culture is alive and thriving in the U.S., and CBD is its newly claimed territory. Recipes for products ranging from gummies to facial scrubs and beard wax to candles and personal lubricant jostle for space online. Message boards teem with recommendations, refinements, and cautionary tales for CBD consumers looking to save, or earn, a few extra bucks by taking a walk on the manufacturing side. 

A small 30ml bottle of CBD oil can cost up to $300 depending on the quality and strength per dose. Many who find previously unattainable relief with CBD for ailments from the minor to the debilitating but struggle to afford the price tag of the more potent formulations are now buying CBD hemp flower by the gram and crafting their own products at home. 

The process in most cases is not overly onerous, although the hemp flower buds must be “decarboxylated” before use, which is an intimidating term that simply refers to the process of putting the hemp buds under low heat (between 225-245 degrees Fahrenheit) for about an hour in order to activate their chemical and pharmacological effects. Afterwards, the hemp buds are ready to be used for teas, cocktails, baking, infused into oil, etc. It sounds pretty straightforward, but there is still room for frustrating and costly user error to occur. Case in point, a month ago I was gifted a gallon bag full of CBD flower (about $500 worth) from friends who lease their land to a local CBD company for hemp cultivation. I was eager to take a stab at DIY CBD oil, and felt confident enough in my herbal training that I would end up with an abundance of potent medicine. My friends had already decarboxylated the buds, so all I needed to do was borrow my parents’ crock pot (mine was far too small), add the buds and some olive oil, and set the whole thing on “low”. Unfortunately, the “low” setting on my parents’ ancient crockpot was sufficient to burn my lovely little buds to brittle black bits. The contents ended up smelling like a Thanksgiving dinner gone horribly wrong- a Thanksgiving dinner made from $500 worth of groceries. 

My own plans for consuming and gifting homemade CBD oil might be temporarily on hold, but there are still plenty of would-be makers and entrepreneurs out there eager to get into the CBD game. The abundance of articles like this Business News Daily how-to for starting one’s own online CBD business point to a burgeoning participation in this exploding market. If a recent study cited by Iris Dorbian in Forbes Magazine is accurate and the CBD market could indeed surpass $20 billion dollars by 2024, there is plenty of room for DIYers and entrepreneurs alike to work for CBD, and make CBD work for them. 

 


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonDecember 2, 2019
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5min00

Skateboarding has long been considered an “outlaw” sport on the recreational spectrum, attracting those for whom the structure and homogenous culture of organized athletics holds little appeal. Its anti-establishment origins, outlined in greater detail in this 2013 Skateboarding Magazine article, can be traced back to surfer culture, as wave riders realized there might be a way to surf city streets with the same élan and excitement that they applied to hanging ten in the water.

Both snowboarders and skateboarders have been associated with having a friendly relationship with cannabis. There is speculation that the original California high schoolers that met at 420 to get high, most likely rode on skateboards. Snowboarding’s admittance into the Olympics made many athletes ponder kipping the event if they had to give up smoking pot. The Olympics seemed to look the other way. Many professionals in both sports made no effort to hide their love of cannabis, which kept the rebellious nature of skateboarding intact.

But in recent years, skateboarding has moved away from the fringes and into the limelight with the popular X Games, an extreme sports event produced, hosted, and broadcast by ESPN, and demonstrated by the fact that skateboarding will be an official Olympic sport in Tokyo in 2020. This has given rise to some concern that the stereotype of the stoner skater will be proven true enough to keep some of the sport’s top athletes out of contention, as it did skateboarder Corey Juneau. Ranked seventh in the world, Juneau was suspended for six months after testing positive for THC in 2018.

As skateboarding’s competitiveness, popularity, and main street respectability grow, some of the sport’s biggest names are stepping out in front of companies that promise clean, potent, risk-free performance enhancement through CBD. Michael Apstein, a founding partner of Primary Growth Partners, says that “There is a long history of outlaw brands from other market segments breaking through to the general market – from surfing and skateboarding to extreme sports and certainly in music, apparel and recreation brands.” As the benefits of CBD gain visibility in all corners of the marketplace, skateboarding’s top athletes are endorsing products that provide low THC or THC-free alternatives to marijuana. Old school skateboarding legend Tony Hawk has even developed Birdhouse CBD Balm by producer Canna Hemp, a line of CBD recovery creams that target the epic aches and pains of the action sports market.

Professional skateboarder Andy McDonald, 23-time X Games medalist and 10-time world champion, recently partnered with CBD manufacturer Extract Labs to spread the word about the benefits of CBD for extreme sports athletes. McDonald, who used his platform as a professional skateboarder to take an anti-drug message all the way to the Clinton White House, credits the pain-alleviating benefits of hemp-derived CBD for helping him manage the cumulative effects of over 35 years of skating.

Social CBD, a company that markets a range of hemp-derived CBD products that guarantee a 0.0% THC content, recently hooked X-Games Skateboarding gold medalist Nyjah Huston as a spokesperson. Huston stakes his legacy as the winningest skateboarder in history on Social CBD’s promise to deliver a product pure enough to endure the scrutiny of the Olympic committee.

As skateboarding continues to move deeper into the mainstream of competitive sports, its shining stars will no doubt continue to seek out the healing benefits of CBD and the sponsorship dollars of those companies intent on making it the must-have, performance-enhancing supplement for extreme athletes.


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonNovember 19, 2019
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4min00

CBD products are finding a robust market among yoga moms, career women with boho-chic sensibilities, and social media lifestyle mavens alike. These are busy women with the means to incorporate wellness and lifestyle elements into their daily routines that might have once been the exclusive purview of L.A. celebs or NYC fashionistas. Their purchasing power is real, their willingness to put money down on the latest trend to achieve inner peace and outer glow bottomless, and the lengths to which manufacturers are willing to go to win their business boundless.

CBD Workout Gear

Behold athleisure company Acabada, which markets active lifestyle clothing similar to that sold by Lululemon (NYSE: LULU) and Kate Hudson’s Fabletics line. Acabada is the first brand to offer workout wear laced with CBD oil. At $160 for a pair of leggings, the company’s claim that this line decreases soreness and shortens workout recovery time bets hard on the dedication of women in their late twenties to mid-forties to optimal health in a booty-boosting package.

Yoga Lovers 

An article by Rochelle Bilow on Wanderlust.com (a website popular with both aspirational yoginis and those already at the leading edge of wellness trends) proposes that CBD is the perfect way to take your yoga “to an entirely new level of chill”. According to Bilow, CBD is a shortcut to the “zen mind” that is the golden goal of yoga practice.

Luxury CBD

Christine Yi (who was profiled by marie claire magazine as one of fifteen women to watch in the CBD industry) is co-founder of Potli, a company that focuses on CBD-infused food and cooking essentials. She conceptualizes her business as one that creates “ingredients for the elevated life.” The concept of “the elevated life” aptly defines the CBD promise to the same affluent women, median age 34, who follow goop, Gwyneth Paltrow’s popular lifestyle brand. Prone to jumping on the latest trend to offer a make-up free glow, fit body, and buddha mind, this population will happily plonk down $55 for a Lavender Sleep Mask from Kana Beauty for an “elevated” sleep experience.

According to a Gallup poll conducted in August of this year, the top three reasons that Americans use CBD products are pain, anxiety, and sleep. In a study conducted by the National Institute of Health Research in the UK, it was found that women are twice as likely to be affected by anxiety as men while The National Sleep Foundation claims that not only are women more likely to have sleep disorders than men, but also more likely to experience nighttime pain.

These statistics suggest that it is not just slick marketing that is driving the charcoal lemonade-sipping, Gwyneth glow-seeking crowd to the marketplace in search of the next best thing in CBD (Votary Super Seed Facial Oil anyone? A bargain at $110!). However, when it comes to finding ways to lure women with a wellness bent to open their wallets and minds to the benefits of CBD, Madison Avenue seems to understand that it’s the promise as much as the product that matters.

 


Julie AitchesonJulie AitchesonNovember 15, 2019
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2min00

Product: Hemptown Chew CBD Gum (Mint Flavor) by Hemptown USA

Company: Hemptown USA

Hemptown Chew CBD Gum has the look of a TUMS tablet, but softens easily in the mouth with a subtle yet strong enough mint flavor to overpower any of the musty grassiness of many CBD-infused products. As with other “natural” chewing gums using sweeteners such as sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, and/or stevia (Hemptown Chews uses all of these), the flavor quickly dissipates while the texture becomes rubbery, making chewing laborious. However, with a stated fifteen milligrams of CBD and five milligrams of CBG (Cannabigerol, the “chemical parent” of CBD and THC) per serving, Hemptown Chews have a lot more to offer the consumer than a more supple stick of Wrigley’s.

The packaging is pleasingly minimalist, with two servings per pouch. The fact that the gum is sugar-free, gluten-free, and has zero calories appealed to my inner health nut, while the high concentration of CBD and of CBG prompted me to keep working the gum over after it had lost its flavor and initial marshmallowy texture. Within about five minutes, the familiar lassitude I associate with CBD descended with a pleasant drop of my shoulders and a loosening in my chest that signaled a switch from the fight-or-flight mode of my workday to the rest-and-digest vibe I slip into once I clock out for the evening. Unfortunately, it was only twelve-thirty.

Though the physical relaxation was pleasant, for me the effect on my cognitive function was too strong. I enjoyed the gum’s swift action and its potency (if not the mouthfeel and flavor after the first minute or so) but would restrict my use of this product to times when efficiency and laser focus are not required. While perhaps well-suited for those CBD users with a higher tolerance, for me, Hemptown Chew is a “functional gum” whose function will be purely recreational.



About Us

The Hemp Market Report will target news from the fast growing worlds of cannabidiol (CBD) and hemp. As a sister site to the Green Market Report, HMR will cover financial stories, but also take a look at lifestyle news as well. The Hemp Market Report will also publish sponsored content as we seek to expand our content offerings.


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